shirataki stir fry with soy sauce and wood ear mushrooms

Shirataki with wood ear mushrooms bathed in savory soy sauce (Japanese recipe)

Shirataki noodles and the magical combination of sesame soy sauce come together like long lost lovers. Have you ever had a noodle so good you wish you had double or triple the amount? This might very well be the shirataki noodle recipe you’ve been looking for  – all your life!

 

shirataki stir fry with soy sauce and wood ear mushrooms

       

Shirataki noodles

might be the jiggliest noodles you’ll ever cook with

shirataki noodles (miracle noodles) are made from the same plant as konnyaku

and if you’re familiar with the neutral flavor and nutritional characteristics of konnyaku

shirataki will provide all of the above in a jiggly noodle form.

and thanks to those characteristics, shirataki noodles can be seasoned in various ways

these shirataki noodles with savory soy sauce seasoning are absolutely one of my favorites.

maybe they’ll soon be yours too!

       

What are the benefits of eating shirataki noodles?

just like konnyaku…

shirataki noodles have zero sugar
shirataki noodles have zero fat
shirataki noodles have zero protein
shirataki noodles have zero carbohydrates
shirataki noodles have zero calories

so then…. what does shirataki noodles ACTUALLY have ??

just like konnyaku – DIETARY FIBER!

Almost all of the shirataki noodles are water, and the fiber it contains is glucomannan, a soluble fiber.

 

Cooking with shirataki noodles

because shirataki noodles naturally consist mostly of water when you cook it in oil, it’s going to splatter.

To minimize any mess use a deeper frying pan or a dutch oven to catch the oil splattering everywhere.

because the shirataki is a noodle, you can’t brown it as easily as konnyaku blocks though they do form a nice skin if you allow it to cook long enough without moving them.

Key thing is to make sure you have added enough oil to your pan if you’re using a sticky skillet.

Using white shirataki noodles will also help you to see how well they’ve browned, but if you’re using brown shirataki noodles, you can pick up a piece and see if you notice any bubbles or crust formation.

if youre sensitive to the natural odor and flavor of the shirataki noodles, you can tame it by parboiling in water for a minute and draining.

this will also help to remove some of the moisture for better texture and absorb some of the seasoning for better flavor

like konnyaku blocks, shirataki noodles are best enjoyed hot so make sure to serve right away or keep warm until ready to eat.

 

       

What are the best ways to cook with shirataki noodles?

japanese hot pot (nabemono) like sukiyaki is one of the classic ways you can use it.

you cant really substitute them for pasta because they dont provide the same texture or flavor that a wheat containing pasta provides.

however, some dishes like harusame (japanese spring noodle) may work even when using shirataki noodles as a substitute for the harusame.

for example in a soup like miso soup or a Japanese vegetable stir fry where you want a little texture or filler

because they have a neutral flavor they might make for a nice addition to a variety of different dishes, you’ll just have to experiment.

if youre not into experimenting with the shirataki noodles, try one of the 3 shirataki noodle dishes from the video!

to get you started, below you’ll find the first of 3 tasty japanese style shirataki noodle recipes for you to try.

 

Shirataki with wood ear mushrooms bathed in savory soy sauce (Japanese recipe)

 

Shirataki Noodles | 3 Delicious and Healthy Japanese Recipes video

 

 

Print

Shirataki with wood ear mushrooms bathed in savory soy sauce (Japanese recipe)

  • Author: patrick

Ingredients

Scale

 

  • 1 large pack shirataki noodles, parboiled
  • 1 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp white sugar
  • 3 Tbsp mirin
  • 2 Tbsp shoyu kouji
  • Freshly cracked black pepper
  • freshly toasted and ground sesame seeds

Instructions

  1. Heat up a saute pan on medium heat and add sesame oil.
  2. Once the pan is hot enough, add the shirataki noodles along with the sugar, mirin and shoyu kouji
  3. Mix well to spread the koji evenly and cook until the alcohol smell is gone and the liquid has reduced.
  4. Top with toasted ground sesame seeds and pepper!

 

 

 

Konnichiwa! (Hello!) I'm Pat Tokuyama, a Japanese tofu cookbook author, who travels for music, food, and adventure. If you like Japanese food, consider joining the new Daidokoro community to discover how to cook more tasty japanese food!!

** Curious about the Plant Based Japanese Cooking Club? ** Learn more here!

 

have you tried a japanese shirataki dish before?

what did you make ? lmk in the comments!

PS if you havent yet maybe subscribe so you dont miss any of my new japanese cooking videos

 

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Konnichiwa! (Hello!) I'm Pat Tokuyama, a Japanese tofu cookbook author, who travels for music, food, and adventure. If you like Japanese food, consider joining the new Daidokoro community to discover how to cook more tasty japanese food!!

** Curious about the Plant Based Japanese Cooking Club? ** Learn more here!

 

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