Japanese Chiffon Cake with Sencha (Japanese green tea)
Are you the type of person who loves a light airy cake? Or do you prefer one that’s densely moist with a bit more to each bite? I actually enjoy both! And this chiffon cake is more on the light side and by pairing that airy and super soft texture, goes extremely welly with sencha. We started with whole leaves and chopped ’em into itty little bits in my spice grinder. The result? A soft green tea flavor cake that is well-balanced in terms of flavor, texture and goes well with many toppings.
Servings Prep Time
12people 15minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30minutes 60minutes
Servings Prep Time
12people 15minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30minutes 60minutes
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 340 F.
  2. First separate egg yolks from the whites
  3. Use a stand mixer and add the sugar in 2-3 batches to the egg whites and whisk on high speed until stiff peaks form.
  4. Process tea leaves in a spice grinder to powderize them.
  5. Using a flour sifter or wire mesh strainer sift flour and tea into a mixing bowl.
  6. Combine sugar withe egg yolks and whisk until pastel yellow.
  7. Add in oil and water and whisk into egg yolk mixture until incorporated
  8. Add the egg yolk mixture to the sifted flour and tea, whisk until just combined.
  9. Gently fold the meringue with the flour-tea-yolk mixture until just combined.
  10. Add to your tube cake pan and drop gently on the counter a couple times and/or use a chopstick to zig zag through the batter so the top will be flat (after you invert it)
  11. Bake at 340F for 30 minutes.
  12. Once baked, remove and invert. Allow to cool.
  13. Once cooled remove from the tube pan. (make sure to use a slim chopstick or skewer to separate from the sides)
  14. Serve with powdered sugar, ice cream or whipped cream with some anko!
Recipe Notes

I used Japanese flour – hakurikiko. If you can’t find us Japanese flower just use cake flour American or make your own cake flour by substituting 2 tablespoons of cornstarch to 1 cup of all purpose flour and take out 2 tablespoons of all-purpose flour and I have cake flour

 

Konnichiwa! (Hello!) I'm Pat Tokuyama, a Japanese tofu cookbook author, who travels for music, food, and adventure. If you like Japanese food and it's your first time here, join the new Daidokoro FB group - a small community of Japanese cuisine enthusiasts!

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