How to Make Okonomiyaki Hiroshima style

This Hiroshima style okonomiyaki is special to me because it reminds me of one of my trips to Japan. For this variation, we’re using yakisoba noodles and adding in a sunny side up egg. It’s best served hot off the stove and topped with Kewpie Mayonnaise, Okonomiyaki sauce and of course – aonori, katsuobushi, and shichimi pepper. Yes, all of those!

Hiroshima Style Okonomiyaki

 

Hiroshima Style Okonomiyaki (お好み焼き広島風)

This Hiroshima style okonomiyaki is my favorite.

There.

I said it.

I like this more than Osaka the other most popular okonomiyaki. In Japan, there’s a rivalry between Hiroshima and Osaka, on who has better okonomiyaki.

Similar to the rivalry of New York pizza versus Chicago style pizza. which do you like more? 

Hiroshima style okonomiyaki is put together differently and also has different ingredients.

What I like about Hiroshima style okonomiyaki are all the delicious layers of flavor.

Even better is that the batter is not as thick and it includes noodles.

I remember the first time I had it.

It was many years ago on a return to Hiroshima.

There are tons of restaurants near the Hiroshima station that serve it.

And that’s where we went. I found a place on Tabelog, the Japanese equivalent of Yelp.

It was soo good.

Life changed.

Forever.

From that day on okonomiyaki was never the same.

 

Yo! I'm Pat, a self-taught cook, who travels for music, food, and adventure. Here I share my knowledge of Japanese cooking, indoor gardening, and points travel.

If it's your first time here - learn more about me.

I also post new videos on YT each Weds. Live Cooking Season 2 will resume in mid-May join me in my kitchen!


 

Noodles in okonomiyaki!?

The noodles make it so much heavier and that much tastier!

I had no idea noodles could be put into it until I saw and ate it for the first time.

Funny how much of a bubble you can live in, sometimes. Isn’t it?

Since then, I’ve learned that for me yakisoba > udon.

What about you? What’s yours?

Aside from the noodles, my other favorite part is the layering.

 

Hiroshima Style Okonomiyaki-3

Layering the Okonomiyaki

Like I said before, I love the layers of Hiroshima style okonomiyaki.

If you’ve followed me for a while, you know I really like complex foods.

And this is right up there, with a lot going on.

How many ingredients are we working with here? Over 10+ by the time it’s plated! 

That is a lot of flavor!

For the fillings, I like to stick with the traditional cabbage, green onion, and moyashi (bean sprouts).

For the meat, I actually like beef more than pork. Mostly since the beef is generally less fatty.

And once we have the meat cooked through, the noodles loose and hot, we take this delicious mess of food and add a semicooked sunny side up egg.

Yes. You must add that half cooked egg.

And then to enjoy this okonomiyaki in all it’s glory, be generous in your application of Kewpie mayonnaise, okonomiyaki sauce, katsuonushi, aonori, and shichimi pepper.

Just how I like it.

Oh and yes, you will get a food coma. Even if you drink strong tea and coffee.

So get ready~!

Do not substitute okonomiyaki mix for the flour below.

Ahem. Mom.

If you can’t find hakurikiko, you can buy it online at Amazon.

It’s not the same as American all-purpose flour and it’s not cake flour either.

It’s Japanese flour and if you want that texture, consistency and flavor I recommend using hakurikiko.

You can use hakurikiko for other baked goods like cakes or breads so it definitely won’t go unused.

If you don’t want to make the batter from scratch, just buy a mix!

Okonomiyaki is popular enough that you can find them online also!

All you need to add is just the egg and water.

The secret to getting the right texture is to let it rest in the refrigerator for at least an hour. (so the gluten can relax, just like crepes!)

 

For the my recipe below, we make the batter from scratch, that way there aren’t any of the unnecessary additives and preservatives.

Just egg, flour, water and a little mirin for flavor/umami!

Other recipes may call for potato, baking powder and baking soda, but the texture is a little heavier and dense, as compared to this one which is light and crispy! Just imagine: crepe not pancake.

Are you ready to make okonomiyaki?!

 

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Print Recipe
Okonomiyaki (Savory Japanese Pancake) Hiroshima style BigOven - Save recipe or add to grocery list Yum
!Batter Mix the first 3 ingredients of the batter together. Once combined add flour and whisk until there are no more clumps visible. Refrigerate at least 1 hour. !Okonomiyaki Meanwhile prepare the rest of the ingredients, cut the cabbage, green onion and measure out other ingredients. Heat a large cast iron or large pan on medium heat. Spray with oil and spread a thin layer of the batter (1/4in thick and roughly 6in wide) and allow to cook for 20 seconds. Add on the moyashi, cabbage, tenkasu and green onion. Top with meat and another generous serving of batter. (This batter will help the ingredients stick together when you flip) Once the bottom layer appears to begin to turn a light brown (the color of a fox), flip and cook the other side. Push the vegetables to the side, and make space for the yakisoba noodles. Add a little oil to the pan and drop the noodles next to the vegetable/crepe. Season noodles with pepper, katsuobushi flakes, and a little okonomiyaki sauce. By this point the meat should have cooked through (check by peeking under if unsure). Transfer the okonomiyaki vegetables, on top of the noodles. Push this to the side, and add a little oil. Crack an egg and the yolk, allow to cook for 30 seconds and then place the okonomiyaki on top. Garnish with aonori, sesame seeds, okonomiyaki sauce and mayonnaise.
Hiroshima Style Okonomiyaki
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Japanese
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Batter (4-8 servings)
Okonomiyaki (one serving)
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Japanese
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Batter (4-8 servings)
Okonomiyaki (one serving)
Hiroshima Style Okonomiyaki
Instructions
Batter
  1. Mix the first 3 ingredients of the batter together. Once combined add flour and whisk until there are no more clumps visible. Refrigerate at least 1 hour.
Okonomiyaki
  1. Meanwhile prepare the rest of the ingredients, cut the cabbage, green onion and measure out other ingredients.
  2. Heat a large cast iron or large pan on medium heat. Spray with oil and spread a thin layer of the batter (1/4in thick and roughly 6in wide) and allow to cook for 20 seconds.
  3. Add on the moyashi, cabbage, tenkasu and green onion. Top with meat and another generous serving of batter. (This batter will help the ingredients stick together when you flip)
  4. Once the bottom layer appears to begin to turn a light brown (the color of a fox), flip and cook the other side.
  5. Push the vegetables to the side, and make space for the yakisoba noodles.
  6. Add a little oil to the pan and drop the noodles next to the vegetable/crepe.
  7. Season noodles with pepper, katsuobushi flakes, and a little okonomiyaki sauce.
  8. By this point the meat should have cooked through (check by peeking under if unsure).
  9. Transfer the okonomiyaki vegetables, on top of the noodles.
  10. Push this to the side, and add a little oil.
  11. Crack an egg and the yolk, allow to cook for 30 seconds and then place the okonomiyaki on top.
  12. Garnish with aonori, sesame seeds, okonomiyaki sauce, mayonnaise, and shichimi.
 

Yo! I'm Pat, a self-taught cook, who travels for music, food, and adventure. Here I share my knowledge of Japanese cooking, indoor gardening, and points travel.

If it's your first time here - learn more about me.

I post new videos on YT each Weds. Live Cooking Season 2 will resume in mid-May join me in my kitchen!


   

2 thoughts on “How to Make Okonomiyaki Hiroshima style

  • February 21, 2018 at 5:41 pm
    Permalink

    A very satisfying and filling version … I don’t make it often but it’s delicious.

    Reply
    • February 21, 2018 at 6:17 pm
      Permalink

      agree! it’s very filling and quite delicious as you say 🙂

      Reply

Feed the shark!